New Technology Challenge: Vendor Competency

technology

It’s important to set clear expectations. Some vendors can perform a Security Vulnerability Assessment (SVA), for example, while others more suited to hardware installation. And when new technology is on the horizon, it’s important to review vendor roles and responsibilities.

Security Vulnerability Assessment

SVAs are performed by companies, usually licensed or certified to do so, that are highly skilled with surveys involving combined technologies. They compare the current system to a set of expected and potential risks. SVAs can be performed once or on a scheduled basis, depending upon changes that modify risk.

Site Survey

Site surveys typically follow an SVA as part of an overall security deployment strategy by technology experts in one or more specific technical fields. For example, a security integrator may bring a manufacturer’s representative to a facility to assist with a site survey. The technologies required to secure a facility are complex; however, the individual site survey is not likely to consider all aspects of the organization’s risk like an SVA.

Demonstration

Following a site survey, the technical experts from the manufacturer and integrator may perform a system demonstration for the Security Director. This is an opportunity to evaluate the proposed system prior to purchase, ensure that it fits within the SVA-recommended security strategy, and demonstrate that the system functions within the organization’s operational and emergency response plan.

System Design

Once the demonstration is complete, and expectations are set, the security integrator will create a complete system design with assistance from the equipment manufacturer.

Installation

Following final design approval and system purchase, the security integrator will install the system.

Maintenance

Once installed, the system must be continually maintained. Most installation teams are responsible for maintenance as well, but some integrators have dedicated maintenance teams.

Bottom Line: Partnership

A security system is only as reliable as the weakest link in the project team. A qualified security integrator will clearly outline project performance expectations in conjunction with the Security Director. These expectations must satisfy the end-user’s expectations of integrator responsibility and involvement. Installation and maintenance teams should be regularly attending classes and obtaining pertinent certifications. The security integrator’s project management and sales teams must be well versed in modern technologies and should be able to anticipate the needs of the end user.

You can count on Securitronics to provide expert advice for your most demanding safety and security concerns.

Our Solutionists are dedicated problem-solvers, always ready to use new and innovative technologies to develop your plan and secure your property, assets, and personnel. Our goal is to build long-term, lasting partnerships of absolute trust and personalized services with the most skilled and talented security professionals.

Contact Securitronics today. 800.795.3747

Network Impact from HD Security Cameras

networkNe

Security manufacturers are developing ultra-high-resolution cameras that produce detailed images to protect facilities and monitor operations. As analog and legacy IP systems are being replaced, IT departments are being called to assist with planning, installing, and managing the HD systems.

Data and bandwidth implications

New high-resolution cameras create approximately 5 megabits of data per second (Mbps). Ultra-high megapixel panoramic cameras can create as much as 30 megabits or more of data per second. This amount of data must be managed from the moment it leaves the camera, across the network, to the viewing station at the security desk, to the storage appliance pool receiving terabytes to petabytes of streaming video 24 hours a day. Video streams must be viewed and recorded without loss of resolution.

Network infrastructure

Network switches are deployed with respect current and future demands, but often overlooking video surveillance bandwidth demands. Network administrators will need to consider the deployment of physically separated networks for security and business production. They will also consider multicast protocol to reduce network flooding in certain situations. Power over Ethernet (PoE) is the most common way to provide power to security cameras and must be considered when determining the total draw from network switch hardware.

Computer hardware

Multiple departments will need viewer access to security cameras. IT will need to determine if new cameras can be viewed reliably on the existing video graphic cards. Servers must be deployed that can handle the data being created by dozens, hundreds, or even thousands of cameras. If the organization runs in a virtualized environment, licensing and available processor assets must be assessed.

Storage appliances

The amount of storage required is computed with a formula that uses data estimations created by the cameras. Storage devices are then deployed in a centralized data center or in decentralized locations across a campus.

Cybersecurity

Reputable manufacturers engineer cameras and other devices that are penetration attack tested. They also provide regular firmware updates to ensure that new attack methods can’t exploit previously unknown vulnerabilities. Likewise, your security integration partner will perform camera firmware updates as part of the ongoing security maintenance agreement. You must also consider the increased risk of insider hacking. By placing more cameras in plain view, the risk of internal challenges to security can increase. Employees or students can attempt to access security cameras and other devices through their internal network connection. Strict password protection and, in many cases, virtual private network (VPN) policies should be used to prevent unauthorized access to security devices.

Bridging security demands and IT support

You can count on Securitronics to provide expert advice for your most demanding safety and security concerns. We are dedicated problem-solvers, always ready to use new and innovative technologies to develop your plan and secure your property, assets, and personnel. Our goal is to build long-term, lasting partnerships based on absolute trust and personalized services from the most skilled and talented security professionals available.

Contact Securitronics Solutionist today. 800.795.3747

On-Site Security Risk Assessment

assessment

Imagine a facility constructed from day 1 with future security requirements as the top priority. Does that describe your security landscape?  Most likely not. The level of security installed on day 1 does not always reflect the security required of the organization later.

There’s often a mismatch between budget, specifier input, and end user operational requirements. Requirements change with facility capabilities and in response to prevalent threats. A facility that was once secure with cameras at the entrance, may now require security checkpoints at the property entrance and a perimeter fence detection system with cameras watching the property line. Organizations change, the world changes, and security technologies change in response.

Organizational changes

Expansion or reduction of the physical footprint of an organization is impacted by new construction projects. New projects may require alterations or upgrades to the existing systems. Prior to physical changes, a complete security risk assessment must be performed to uncover the new security requirements for the organization. Likewise, if a business changes its scope of operation, there may be the need to increase security. This may happen when cash flow changes or the potential hazard increases.

Environmental changes

If a local threat arises, it may impact a cluster of facilities. If a national or global threat arises, the entire vertical market must adopt new security measures, all of which require security risk assessments. For example, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) directs 16 specific critical infrastructure categories related to cyber, physical, and electronic security requirements. These requirements are reviewed and updated to reflect global security changes and their impact on specific industries.

Security technology changes

Improvements in security system technology are occurring at a staggering rate. Surveillance cameras are being produced with dramatically higher resolution capability. Access control systems are becoming more sophisticated, from card credentials to biometric readers. Legacy perimeter intrusion detection systems (PIDS) attached to fences are being replaced with modern power over Ethernet (PoE) devices and increased, smart sensitivity capabilities. When the mean time between failure (MTBF) for legacy security devices may have been as long as 15 years using analog technology, new IP based system devices may only have a three to five-year replacement cycle.

Action plan

These common scenarios present reasons to conduct a security risk assessment on a regularly scheduled basis in addition to when specific needs arise. Performing these assessments regularly can bring unrealized vulnerabilities to the surface.  These assessments should be conducted by security technology experts in conjunction with officials familiar with the unique operations of the organization. Without expertise from both sides, vulnerabilities may remain overlooked.

You can count on Securitronics to perform comprehensive security risk assessments that address your most demanding safety and security concerns. We are dedicated problem-solvers, always ready to use new and innovative technologies to develop your plan and secure your property, assets, and personnel. Our goal is to build long-term, lasting partnerships based on absolute trust and personalized services from the most skilled and talented security professionals available.

Contact Securitronics today. 800.795.3747

smartsecuritycamera

How ‘Smart Security Cameras’ Benefit Business

Old security cameras sent low-quality video surveillance footage to be recorded and played back after something bad happened. Today, high resolution security cameras work with video analytics to streamline security operations and keep security staff focused on unauthorized behavior.

Security cameras can also be used to analyze anonymous customer habits in retail environments and enhance the customer experience in the service industry, emergency departments, movie theaters, and more. They can also help with workplace safety by shutting down machinery or redirecting vehicles when a safety threat is present. Plant, manufacturing, and warehouse workers can be warned when they are entering restricted areas by triggering audible or visual alerts.

Video analytics improve retail operations, and the customer experience, by helping managers to keep an eye on checkout lines. A notification can be sent from the video system to management, alerting them that additional lanes need to be opened. Movie theater management can be notified when a long line has formed at the ticket counter, prompting them to open additional ticket windows. Likewise, once inside, movie goers gather at the food and beverage areas. Long and slow lines can result in a decrease in sales. By recognizing the right time to open a new register, theater operators keep guests moving through every part of their visit.

In emergency departments, smart cameras can count how many people are in the waiting room. Notifications are sent to the charge nurse so that the appropriate resources are dedicated to triage, speeding up patient care. Vehicles parked in patient drop-off areas can delay patients and even become a safety risk. Security can be notified when a vehicle is left in a “no parking” zone for too long.

Industrial facilities are continually evaluating environmental safety to protect employees and visitors, and ensure compliance with industrial safety regulations. Facility pathways can be monitored by smart surveillance cameras that know the difference between a vehicle and a person. The cameras create email, audio, and visual alerts when a person is entering a hazardous area within the facility. Likewise, the cameras can create alerts when a vehicle is outside of normal operating areas, such as a predetermined driving path. Smart cameras can also determine when a tractor trailer loading dock is occupied or is ready for the next delivery. Employees approaching dangerous machinery can also be warned with visual and audio cues that are based on virtual line crossings or danger zone intrusions.

You can count on Securitronics to deliver innovative, cost-effective solutions that address your most demanding safety and security concerns. Our team of Solutionists e dedicated problem-solvers, always ready to use new and innovative technologies to fit your plans and needs. Our goal is to build long-term, lasting partnerships based on absolute trust, personalized services, and the most skilled and talented people available.

Contact Securitronics today. 800.795.3747 or click here to contact us for a FREE Security Consultation

chemicalsecurity

Chemical Manufacturing and Storage Security

Our nation’s security depends on the safety and security of facilities that manufacture, store, or utilize hazardous materials. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Office of Infrastructure Protection (IP) leads and coordinates programs and policies on a national scope that impact local security implementation. The mission is to uncover vulnerabilities and develop programs to address the risks. Presidential Policy Directive 21 (PPD-21) advances a national policy and outlines 16 critical infrastructure sectors.

When addressing Chemical Sector considerations, it’s important to consider how your organization stores and secures chemicals. Manufacturing plants and other industrial facilities may fall under this category. Your workers may not consider your facility to be a target for international or domestic terrorism, but as a leader, you think on a broad scale, and may decide that your facility is due for a security risk and vulnerability assessment.

The chemical sector is comprised of hundreds of thousands of chemical facilities across the United States which manufacture, store, or utilize chemicals to produce products that are critical for modern life. These chemicals range from basic household supplies to agricultural chemicals to pharmaceuticals.

Relationship Development

It’s critical to develop working relationships with local law enforcement agencies, and local businesses, and other organizations. Engage an industry-leading security solutions provider who brings experience from similar facilities like yours. Their knowledge of best practices will speed up the planning process and ensure a solid security foundation is established.

Planning

Planning for the prevention of and reaction to an attack is critical. A solid security plan starts with your professional relationships. Your security vendor will look at your project from a multi-dimensional perspective. When it comes to security, everything from perimeter protection to recording video cameras needs to be considered:

  • Video surveillance
  • Access control
  • Intrusion detection
  • Perimeter fence detection
  • Gates, bollards, and turnstiles
  • Voice communication
  • Policies and procedures

Training

Employees need to be trained to react appropriately in the event of a security breach or attack. Training starts with procedural awareness and develops into the knowledge of minute security system details.

Reporting: “If you see something, say something,” has become the common mantra of homeland security. It may rarely cross an employee’s mind to report suspicious activity, but if your facility could be a target, they need to keep their eyes open for anything out of the ordinary.

Take Action

DHS has developed resources to get you started:

Take the initiative today to contact a Solutionist at Securitronics to assess and develop your approach to security at your facility.

A complimentary site visit gets you started on the path to a safer, more secure facility.

800.795.3747

COO’s Security FAQ: I have a security problem at my facility and need a solution to make it more secure. Where do I begin?

coo

As the COO, the entire operational ecosystem of your company comes first. When a security problem arises, it can impact data integrity, business continuity, and the financial bottom line.

Situation

What type of security problem is it?

  • Cyber security
  • Physical security

Who is the threat?

  • Known intruder (insider or close affiliate)
  • Unknown intruder (outsider)

Internal Resources

For a cyber security intrusion challenge, your IT department will be the first resource you consult. They’ll need to work with you and outside firms to resolve the situation. The scale of the situation may be limited to a few computers or company-wide, involving in-house servers or cloud-based service providers.

For a physical security challenge, your security operations team will be a primary resource. They’ll rely on video surveillance recordings and access control activity logs as a common starting point for prevention and investigation.  Once the breach is uncovered, a review of how to prevent similar situations in the future is in order.

Responsibility

No one likes to consider the risk presented by current or former employees. From retail to manufacturing, risk is always present among employees.

Threats from the outside can involve past employees or players separate from your company.

External Resources

Several resources are available to your company. There are three primary categories:

  • Security consultants
  • Security integrators
  • Security manufacturer representatives

All three of these categories exist in both the cyber and physical security realms.

Closing a Physical Security Gap

Closing the gap in a current physical security strategy involves a holistic review of the current security approach and a strategic plan implementation to rectify the uncovered weaknesses.

There are many existing systems and policies to review:

  • Access control software
  • Door control hardware
  • Perimeter detection
  • Surveillance cameras
  • Recorded video
  • Backup systems
  • Intrusion detection
  • Perimeter barriers
  • Hours of operation
  • Employee access requirements
  • Legal regulations

Systems Approach

Creating a security zone around your facility, or specific areas, requires multiple systems and enforceable policies. Physical devices like gates, doors, and turnstiles can present physical barriers that delay, control, or prevent entry. Access control software tracks successful and denied requests for entry in log files that are used to review challenges to the security plan. Intrusion detection systems provide a keypad system to turn on or off specific zones within the facility. Video surveillance footage provides a visual record of attempts to breach the perimeter or sensitive interior areas. Synchronization, and often integration, of these disparate systems allows for smooth daily operations as well as speedy investigations of unauthorized behaviors.

Valued Partners

Internal and external valued partners are a must-have. Trusted advisors provide valuable insight when developing policies and planning for security hardware and software system implementation. Securitronics is a solutions-driven, problem solver, selecting the right technology and integrated security systems design for every vertical market. Solutions include video surveillance, access control, intercom, communications, and intrusion detection systems.

Contact our team today for a complete physical security evaluation.

Looking for Access Control with No Software Licensing? Consider R-MAC for License-Free Access Control

20507151_1638279879535571_1806169143997363319_o

For the past decade or so, security professionals have been slowly moved towards expensive software licenses and ongoing software maintenance agreements by security manufacturers and IT service & software vendors.

Security industry move to licensing

In the security realm, this became prevalent with the introduction of IP video. When analog video matrix switchers were replaced by video management systems (VMS), the manufacturers needed a way to recoup lost revenue from declining hardware sales. The answer was to charge for software licensing, and along with that came annual Software Maintenance Agreements (SMA).

That trend also seems to have been the same for access control manufacturers.

Not everyone’s ok with that change

Enterprise-class security end users who are heavily supported by their IT department are more agreeable to these new licensing plans. Their IT departments are already accustomed to the licensing required for everything from data storage to virtualization and database management.

Smaller companies with security departments that have historically run autonomously have balked at the new trend in security software licensing. Some video security manufacturers have started to offer various alternative solutions and others are sticking to the licensing strategy.

For example, some security surveillance companies sell enterprise class video system software licenses and SMA’s to support those licenses year over year. The same company, in many cases, also provides small “all-in-one” recording devices that have the licenses bundled into the product with one fee and no annual SMA program.

Enter R-MAC for License-Free Access Control

R-MAC is a complete access control solution, from hardware at the door to the web-based graphical user interface and database, that eliminates complex initial and annual licensing fees with a simple, low cost monthly maintenance fee for the entire bundled system.

Plus, you can even add CCTV integration to the system. Integration of access control and CCTV allows a simplified user experience.  This is particularly important when a security officer is operating in a stressful environment.

Cybersecurity and Private Employee Information

Securitronics, manufacturer of R-MAC, delivers innovative, cost-effective solutions that address security’s most demanding concerns, including cybersecurity.  Our established, internal policies and best practices not only protect our network and infrastructure, but ensure we work in a responsible manner with our customers to help mitigate the risk associated with cybersecurity attacks and vulnerability.

Working with Securitronics

Problem-solvers: we’re not just another security system provider. We look at new technologies and examine ways in which they might fit your current and future needs.

Innovation: we provide state of the art security services. Systems that are ideal for your facility and business.

Our goal: we build long-term, lasting partnerships based on absolute trust, personalized attention and services, and the most skilled and talented people available.

Contact a Solutionist at Securitronics for a complete access control assessment today at 800.795.3747

video

Five Things You Need to Know When Choosing a Video Surveillance System

Security professionals are always on the lookout for new technologies to secure their facility, assets, and personnel. With dramatically new technologies available, it’s important to know what to consider when deciding on a new video surveillance solution.

  1. What are my specific security requirements?
  2. Who do I trust to install the system?
  3. How do I choose the best solution?
  4. How is new technology different from what I used in the past?
  5. How do I future-proof my investment?

Security Requirements

Your facility is unique and has specific needs based on physical attributes, corporate policies, environmental/geographic considerations, budgetary requirements, and internal stakeholder expectations. A fresh look at your current needs is a great place to start your decision-making process.

Physically, you may be on a campus or within a single structure. These attributes will determine the quantity and capability of cameras deployed outside and inside your facility.

Corporate policies or industry lawmakers may dictate a minimum retention time for recorded video or the Detection, Observation, Recognition, or Identification (DORI) requirements for camera fields of view. These will significantly impact the storage solution. The more days you retain recorded video, the more storage space is required. DORI is a standard that determines what evidence is captured in recorded video and sets stakeholder expectations in advance.

Environmentally and geographically, you may need to consider extreme temperatures, wind, or even crime statistics in the region. Likewise, determining the outer perimeter of the system may increase the types of cameras deployed. For example, short range cameras can be used indoors and at entrances whereas fence line perimeters may require long range, high resolution cameras.

Your budget is a major consideration. Knowing the budget in advance will keep the system evaluation process in check. Save time by considering only technologies and system designs that fit your bottom line.

Stakeholders have expectations that you need to meet. The IT department will need to provide the infrastructure for your new IP video solution. Human resources and administration will need a simple user interface to review recorded video for investigations. Security staff will need a system that is smart enough to call attention to camera views that contain pertinent information.

Installation Partner

Gone are the days when the company installing your system connected the last camera, showed your team how to play back video, and left with check in hand. Now, systems are highly complex, riding on an IT network, and requiring ongoing support. Picking your partner is more important now than ever. Be sure to verify installer training and competency. Verify that the company has an IT component that can work with your IT department to ensure a smooth installation and ongoing support without missing a step.

Manufacturer Selection

By choosing the right installation partner, the manufacturer selection process is made a little easier. Once your installation partner knows more about your specific requirements, they can choose the perfect cameras, user interface, and recording solution for your application. They will evaluate the newest technologies from a variety of manufacturers and present only relevant, proven solutions for your consideration. This saves a lot of time during demonstrations and ensures the system will meet your operational needs.

New Technologies

Quality systems make the user experience simple while providing comprehensive options in configuration settings. Managing and using these systems is very different than analog systems of the past. These systems are computer-based and require a different set of skills for operators and administrators. It’s important to outline the differences between your old and new systems. This will allow for proper training and preparation for when the new system is ready to be used.

Future-Proofing Your Investment

Legacy analog video systems allowed you to mix and match component manufacturers quite easily. When IP video revolutionized the video surveillance industry, it brought along some significant “behind the scenes” complexity and incompatibility. Incompatibility across manufacturers was almost guaranteed when IP video solutions first came to the market. After a decade of IP video advancements, manufacturer compatibility has improved considerably. New technology standards like H.264 and ONVIF make future upgrades possible.

The challenge is that technology is changing quickly. Legacy analog video surveillance technology could last for dozens of years without having to be replaced or upgraded. Today, we expect technology to continue to evolve rapidly in a three to five-year time span. The option for renting a system “future-proofs” the change in technology and delivers a higher return on your investment. Furthermore, your annual maintenance costs for hardware and software need to be a component of your system rental or system plan.

How a Solutionist Helps You Navigate the Process

The best advice we can offer is that you pick your partners wisely. Invest a significant amount of time in making sure you’ve assembled the best team from the manufacturer, to the installer, to the internal stakeholders you bring to the table to make big decisions. The right advice throughout the process will ensure a smooth deployment and long-term solution satisfaction. Be sure that your installation partner is both security and IT savvy. Your manufacturer partners need to provide solutions that are compatible with ONVIF and provide 3rd party integration options. Your internal stakeholder partners need to define their expectations for today and tomorrow and remain vested in the decision-making process from beginning to end.

Ready to speak to one of our Solutionists?

Click here to get started

How much will an Access Control System cost your business?

shutterstock_418217857

Choosing and deploying an access control system is a relatively complex decision, and there are a few challenges that could become a risk to productivity. Having the right security partner working with you and your team will prevent and mitigate risks.
However, no matter the chosen solution, an access control system will impact multiple aspects of your business. Impact minimization measures that are considered and initiated with your security partner during the planning process will ensure business continuity.

Financial

Cost should directly reflect the benefit to business security and operations. A business operator will need to consider ongoing costs associated with hardware maintenance, annual software licensing, and person per hour investment.

The initial cost of the system is based on several key components:
• Number of buildings or locations to be secured
• Number of doors to be secured
• Number of credential holders
• Computer hardware or virtualization to be augmented
• Integration to other systems such as video surveillance or intrusion detection
• IT department time commitment to support the deployment
• Human resources, facilities, and other departmental training
The often overlooked, ongoing costs will include:
• Human resources: user management and credential purchases
• IT department: software updates and computer hardware maintenance
• Installer contracts: component maintenance
• Vendor contracts: annual Software Maintenance Agreements (SMA)

Operations

When a new access control system is deployed, company personnel will have new procedures to follow. They may need to carry and display an ID badge or programmed key fob to access the building as well as secure interior areas. Doors that used to be left open for easy access may now be closed and require a free hand to open. Short cuts through the facility may now require a new travel route.

Security

Security will improve as the procedures are followed. Sensitive corporate information will be kept from unauthorized access and visitors will be screened prior to entry. Accountability will improved with activity logs and electronic awareness of facility and sensitive area access.

Safety

Areas that are off limits to untrained personnel will be controlled. The risk of injury, or worse, will be reduced. Compliance with OSHA and local jurisdictional authorities will be streamlined, avoiding costly fines and potential stop-work orders.
System Deployment at a Glance

A simple access control system may include a handful of doors to be controlled with only a few dozen employees using the system. This would require a database, user interface software program, and door control hardware. The system allows doors to be opened when an authorized user presents her credentials and remains secure when an unauthorized credential is presented. It will also remain secure if someone simply pulls on the door.

In a complex system, each door in the system will be treated the same as a door in a simple system. However, there will be far more doors to address. Likewise, a complex system typically involves far more users in the system. These users can be included in the software database, or in some cases, IT departments include the access control system in their LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) database to simplify human resources operations. Users may be placed into smaller user groups with a variety of access “levels”, such as basic facility access or limited access to sensitive administrative spaces.

Cost Sources at a Glance

• Planning meetings
• IT hardware/virtualization
• IT time investment
• System and door hardware installation
• Door replacements and modifications
• Software licensing
• Software Maintenance Agreements
• Integration to additional systems
• Training
• Support contracts
• Credentials

Evaluation and Deployment

Choosing an access control system is a complex decision. There will be expected, and unexpected, challenges that are unique your business and operational needs.

KEEPING ON TRACK

Our Solutionists have extensive experience with access control manufacturing leaders and will provide a perfect match to your unique business needs. Our years of experience ensure minimal impact on operations during installation and we’ll provide ongoing, expert support throughout the life of the solution.

UPCOMING EVENTS – JUNE 10TH 2016

On June 10th, 2016 in the TWIG Auditorium at Rochester General Hospital, Securitronics will be showcasing experts from the Cyber Security and Advanced Biometrics worlds. There will be morning and afternoon sessions featuring Darnell Washington, President of SecureXperts and Bob Cook from FST Biometrics.

CYBER SECURITY – Darnell Washington: SecureXperts Incorporated is a pioneer and a leading security services provider specializing in information security solutions for government, commercial, and financial organizations.

SecureXperts employs security professionals who specialize in Internet, network, and applications security to provide 7×24 support, therefore ensuring the performance and security of your connection and protecting your network from unauthorized access.

SecureXperts specializes in evaluation, assessment, and secure network architecture design of high-risk and mission critical technical environments

ADVANCED BIOMETRICS- Bob Cook : FST’s In Motion IdentificationTM uses a unique fusion of facial recognition, behavioral analytics, and voice analytics. Our technology is able to identify authorized individuals from a distance, and in- motion. There is no slowing down or stopping for the user, as our system provides a seamless access experience that is accurate, reliable and non-intrusive. It identifies authorized personnel quickly and efficiently, providing true, secure access, at the speed of life.

IMID Access, which serves as the backbone of In Motion IdentificationTM, provides identity management and access control solutions, advanced visitor management, fraud detection, remote monitoring and much more.

WE INVITE YOU TO JOIN US

CHOOSE FROM ONE OF TWO SESSIONS MORNING SESSION – 8:00 to 12:00 OR THE AFTERNOON SESSION – 12:30 to 4:30

 AGENDA
  • 8:00 AM – 8:30 AM           Morning Session Check-In
  • 8:30 am – 10:00 am        FST Biometrics Demo
  • 10:00 am – 10:15             Break
  • 10:15 am – 12:00 pm     SecureXperts Presentation
  • 12:30 pm – 1:00 pm       Afternoon Session Check-In
  • 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm         FST Biometrics Demo
  • 2:30 pm – 2:45 pm         Break
  • 2:45 pm – 4:30 pm         SecureXperts Presentation
RESERVE YOUR SPACE AT THIS PRESENTATION BY CONTACTING YOUR SOLUTIONIST
AT 800-795-3747 or fill out the “contact us” section on this page.